THE FACTS

Are you aware of the detrimental effects recreational marijuana can have on our society? Explore our interactive facts, and share them to educate your friends and family on the dangers of Question 2.
Fact

Spate of drugged driving deaths alarms U.S. regulators

The increase corresponds with a movement to legalize marijuana, troubling experts who readily acknowledge that the effects of pot use on drivers remain poorly understood.

(Source)

Fact

Where Recreational Pot is legal: 50% of babies tested at Pueblo hospital tested positive for THC.

Colorado’s legalization of recreational marijuana has led to an increase in the number of babies being born THC-positive. The state and other agencies are now engaged in a campaign to educate women about the possible dangers of using pot during pregnancy and breast feeding.

(Source)

Fact

Washington marijuana-related traffic fatalities have doubled since legalization

Fatal crashes involving drivers who recently used marijuana doubled in Washington after the state legalized the drug, according to the latest research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

(Source)

Fact

In Oregon, troopers reported an increase of 163% in pot DUI arrests in the first six months of legalization.

Fact

Fact Check: “Yes on 2”

Claim #1: “Marijuana will be produced and sold by licensed businesses instead of cartels and criminals.”

Truth: Illegal cartels are rapidly growing in states where recreational pot is now legal. The notion that legalization of recreational marijuana will end the black market and stop the cartels from operating is not only completely false but legalization has made the situation worse. (Read More) FULL FACT CHECK HERE.

Fact

Cartel Facts: “Is Pot Losing Its Buzz in Colorado?”

Since 2013, law officials say, they have busted 88 drug cartel operations across the state, and just last year law-enforcement made a bust that recovered $12 million in illegal marijuana. Adds Coffman: “That’s crime we hadn’t previously had in Colorado.” (Source)

Fact

Study Finds Sharp Increase in Marijuana Exposure Among Colorado Children

Legalizing pot in Nevada would make child friendly, edible versions of the drug available such as brownies, lollipops, and gummy bears which have been easily confused for candy in other states, and eaten by underage children. (Source)

Fact

Kids’ emergency room visits for marijuana increased in Colorado after legalization, study finds

The number of pot related visits of children nine years old and younger to the Emergency Room have doubled and reports to the poison control center are up five times since Colorado legalized pot despite childproof packaging laws. (Source)

Fact

Reports to the poison control center are up 5 times.

A study conducted by a group of Colorado doctors found that “the number of Colorado children who’ve been reported to a poison control center or examined at a hospital for unintentional marijuana exposure annually has spiked since the state legalized recreational cannabis…” The study found that, “eighty-seven cases of children ages 9 and younger ingesting, inhaling or otherwise exposed to cannabis were called in to the state’s regional poison control center from 2014 through 2015 – more than the 76 total cases in the four years preceding legalization, the study says. Exposure-related visits for the same age range also rose at Children’s Hospital Colorado in Aurora: 32 visits for the first two years after legalization, against 30 visits for the four years prior. Nearly half of the hospital visits since 2009 involved edibles such as brownies and candies.” (Source) 

Fact

Study finds fatal crashes in Colorado have risen since legalized marijuana

In the first year pot was available at retail stores in Colorado, ninety-four people died in crashes where a driver involved tested positive for some amount of marijuana, which is up thirty-two percent over previous years. (Source)

Fact

Drug cartels are moving into Colorado

Fact

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Since legalizing marijuana, Colorado climbed to number one among states for both youth (12-17) and college age adults (18-25) marijuana use.

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